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A History of the Land of Artsakh: Karabagh and Genje, 1722-1827.

By: Archbishop Sargis Hasan-Jalaliants

Ka'ren Ketendjian, Robert H. Hewsen

Series: Armenian Studies Series. 17
Availability: In stock
Published: 2013
Page #: xxxviii + 256
Size: 6 x 9
ISBN: ISBN 13: 978-1568591742, 1-56859-174-8
appendix, bibliography, glossary, index, notes

 
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Quick Overview

English translation by Ka’ren Ketendjian
Edited with an Introduction, annotations and Notes by
Robert H. Hewsen

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The subject of this book is the history of Karabagh in the period of the Armeno-Persian and Russo-Persian wars (1722-1827), a region, which the author refers to as the “land of Aghuank.”

The author, Archbishop Sargis Hasan-Jalaliants, begins his narrative with an account of the deeds of Avan yüzbashi (i.e. centurion), the leader of the Armenian rebellion against foreign rule at the time of Peter the Great’s invasion of the Persian Empire in 1722, an invasion that took place after the Afghan invasions of Persia and the fall of the Safavid dynasty. His narrative continues with the Ottoman invasion of Persian Armenia and the resistance offered to it by the Armenian meliks (petty princes) of Karabagh through the reigns of Nadir Shah and Agha Muhammad Khan, and deals with events in Georgia, as well as in the khanates of Shekki, Shirvan, and Ganja down until the Russian occupation in 1827. Indeed, the last short chapters deal almost exclusively with the activities of various Russian generals in South Caucasia in the early nineteenth century.
Besides recording much oral history not found elsewhere, Archbishop Sargis conveys many geographical indications as well as vivid descriptions of fortresses and melikal residences. Valuable, too, is Archbishop Sargis’ descriptions of the deeds of the celebrated Avan yüzbashi and of Melik Egan of Dizak, and of the wars of Panah Khan of Karabagh. Most important of all his historical data, however, is the author’s preservation of the Dashnagir or “Alliance Charter” in which the meliks present the terms under which they hoped to live under Russian suzerainty and which form almost a constitution for the famed Khamsa Melikutiunere or federation of the five principle melik houses of Karabagh.

Prof. Hewsen in his “Introduction” gives a detailed background to the narrative of Archbishop Sargis and contains inter alia detailed descriptions of the Persian khanates in South Caucasia as well as of the Armenian principalities that existed in the region in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries. The “Introduction” also contains a description of the founding of the fortress (later city) of Shushi.

Given its relatively late date of its composition (c. 1830), the hitherto unpublished manuscript history by Archbishop Sargis forms almost a chronological conclusion to the series of translations of Armenian historians made by Professor George Bournoutian all of which have been already published by Mazda Publisher.

Ka'ren Ketendjian

A native of Erevan, Armenia, Ka'ren V. Ketendjian received his master's degree from V. I. Brusov Foreign Language Institute in Armenia where he studied English and Russian languages and literature. From 1984 to 1987, he taught English and Russian languages at Sevan Dudmashen Regional High School. He also received another master's degree from California State University in Fresno where he studied Linguistics and E.S.L. From 1993 to 1997, he taught Russian language at California State University in Fresno. Mr. Ketendjian received his juris doctor degree in law from San Joaquin College of Law. He is a duly licensed attorney and has his own private practice in Fresno, California. where he currently resides with his wife. He is active in the Fresno Armenian community affairs. Mr. Ketendjian's roots are from Gandzak and Cilicia, thus his interest in the book of Archbishop Sargis Hasan-Jalaliants, which is his first major attempt at translating into English a Classical Armenian text.

Robert H. Hewsen

Born in New York City, Robert H. Hewsen received his doctorate from Georgetown University where he studied Armenian history under the late pioneer Armenist Cyril Toumanoff. From 1967 to 1999, he taught Russian and Byzantine History at Rowan University, Glassboro, New Jersey, where he is now Professor Emeritus. In addition, he has taught Armenian history at the Universities of Michigan (1979), Pennsylvania (1980-1983), Tübingen, Germany (1984, 1987), Chicago (1991, 1998, 2008), Columbia (1993, 1999), St. Nersess Seminary (2001), California State University, Fresno (2001), UCLA (2002), and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (2004). Besides numerous armenological articles and book reviews, Dr. Hewsen has published an English translation of the Geography of Ananias of Shirak, and supervised the reprinting of the original Armenian texts of both the long and the short versions of the same work. He has also contributed eight large-scale maps of Caucasia to the Tübingen Atlas of the Middle East, and has recently published Press a 341-page, 278-map historical atlas of Armenia (Univ. of Chicago, 2001). Professor Hewsen has visited Armenia eight times since 1961, and Highland Karabagh twice since 2001.

Foreword

Acknowledgments

List of Maps and Illustrations

Abbreviations

Translator's Preface

Editor’s Preface

Historical Introduction and Notes

Archbishop Sergius Hasan-Jalaliants:
History of Artsakh

Notes to the Translation

Appendix I: Letter of the Meliks to Pope Innocent XII (1691-1700)

Appendix II: The Letter of Javad, Khan of Genje, to General Tsitsianov

Appendix III: Catholicoi of the Aghuan Church

Appendix IV: Dynastic Lists

Appendix V: Chronology

Appendix VI: Genelogical Charts

Appendix VII: Epilogue

Glossary

Bibliohraphy

Index

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