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Tamerlane's Tableware A New Approach to Chinoiserie Ceramics of Fifteenth and Sixteenth-Century Iran

A New Approach to Chinoiserie Ceramics of Fifteenth and Sixteenth-Century Iran

Lisa Golombek, Gauvin A. Bailey, Robert B. Mason

Series: Bibliotheca Iranica: Islamic Art & Architecture Series 6
Availability: In stock
Published: 1996
Page #: viii + 256
Size: 9 x 12
ISBN: 1-56859-043-1
plates, appendix, bibliography

 
$65.00 $45.00

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Quick Overview

The practice of imitating Chinese blue-and-white porcelain in Iran began in the Timurid period (c. 1370-1505). Attempts to distinguish wares actually made in Iran during the 15th century failed because they depended on analysis of the decoration alone. Idiosyncrasies of individual workshops could not be distinguished, and the dates of Chinese models could serve only as broad guidelines. By analysis of materials from kilns and other evidence of manufacture, it is possible to characterize a center of production, and at times even distinguish separate workshops in the same center.

Lisa Golombek

Lisa Golombek

Gauvin A. Bailey

Gauvin A. Bailey
author

Robert B. Mason

Dr. Robert Mason’s research interests cover art, technology, trade, and industry from the beginnings of time to the industrial revolution, with a special interest in the medieval period. Although his research covers the globe, his primary area of interest is the Middle East, while his current field work is in Syria. Dr. Mason received a doctorate in archaeological science from the University of Oxford (1994), and a bachelor's degree in anthropology and geology from the University of Toronto. His biggest area of research has been in the glazed pottery made in the Islamic world between about AD 600-1500. Dr. Mason’s approach to this pottery is multidisciplinary. He have taken an archaeologist's view of the typology and dating of the wares and combined it with analytical techniques to find out where it was made and how it was made. This multidisciplinary approach has provided a new view of this pottery, a view which has disturbed decades-old assumptions about where, when and how these wares were produced. Apart from pottery from all periods, he is also generally interested in scientific analysis of archaeological finds; ancient industries technology and trade; and military architecture, particularly castles.

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