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Tigranes II and Rome. A New Interpretation Based on Primary Sources.

Introduction and Annotated Translation by George A. Bournoutian.

George A. Bournoutian, Hakob H. Manandyan

Series: Armenian Studies Series. 11
Availability: Out of stock
Published: 2007
Page #: xi + 201
Size: 6 x 9
ISBN: ISBN 13: 978-1-56859-166-7, 1-56859-166-7
bibliography, index, notes

Quick Overview

Tigranes II (95-55 B.C.), known in Armenian historiography as Tigranes the Great, is the sole Armenian monarch who not only succeeded in unifying all the lands inhabited by the Armenians, but extended Armenian rule into Syria and northwestern Iran. In the first century B.C. he created an Armenian empire which lasted for some two decades, taking the title of “King of kings,” which until then was only held by the kings of Parthia.

Armenians, not surprisingly, revere Tigranes. In their pride, some Armenians endow him with modern nationalistic traits and ignore the fact that Tigranes possessed a more Hellenistic and, occasionally, Persian, outlook, rather than that of a modern Armenian. Tigranes’ greatness, as will be evident in this study, was in his attempt to forge an independent and powerful state and to break away from the constraints imposed upon Armenia by its geography. Together with Mithridates Eupator, the king of Pontus, he tried to free Asia Minor from Persian military and political threats in the east and those of Rome in the west.

author

George A. Bournoutian

George A. Bournoutian is Professor of East European and Middle Eastern Studies at Iona College, New York. He has taught Iranian history at UCLA and Armenian History at Columbia University, New York University, University of Connecticut, Tufts University, Rutgers University, Ramapo College, and Glendale Community College. He is the author of 30 books, including The Khanate of Erevan Under Qajar Rule and From Tabriz to St. Petersburg: Iran’s Mission of Apology to Russia in 1829. His translations of primary sources such as The Chronicle of Abraham of Crete; Abraham of Erevan’s History of the Wars: 1721-1738 and documents such as Armenians and Russia, A Documentary Record, 1626-1796, Russia and the Armenians of Transcaucasia, A Documentary Record, 1797-1889, and A History of Qarabagh have received laudatory reviews in TLS, BSOAS and other important publications. Professor Bournoutian is a member of the Society for Iranian Studies and a member of the Society for Armenian Studies. He is also a frequent contributor to encyclopedias, various scholarly journals, and collections. His work has been cited in major publications and he is considered a world authority on the history of the South Caucasus in the Modem Period (1400-1900). Professor Bournoutian was born in Isfahan and grew up in Iran. He received his High school diploma from the well-known Andisheh (Don Bosco) institution in Tehran. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. are from UCLA. He is fluent in Armenian, Persian, Russian, and Polish and has a reading command of French. His A Concise History of the Armenian People is considered the best source in English and has been translated into Spanish, Turkish, Arabic, Armenian, Russian and Japanese.
author

Hakob H. Manandyan

Hakob Hamazaspi Manandyan (1873-1952) was one of the major Armenian historians of the twentieth century. Scholars and students continue to use his articles, monographs, and books as definitive sources on a variety of topics. In undertaking a serious study on Tigranes, Professor Manandyan has tried to avoid patriotic sentiment and has concentrated mainly on the non-Armenian Greek and Roman primary sources. He has also examined modern European scholarship on Tigranes and has concluded that Roman imperialism could not tolerate strong independent states in Asia Minor and did everything to under-mine the new Armenian and Pontic states.

Translator's Introduction.

1. Preface.

2. The Political and Economic Conditions of
Western Asia Minor prior to Tabl Tigranes II.

3. The Artaxiad Dynasty and Tigranes.

4. The Armeno-Pontic Alliance and Tigranes' Forays into Cappadocia.

5. The First Mithndatic War (88-84).

6. The Conquests of Tigranes II.

7. The Expansion of Hellenism in Armenia and the
Founding of the City of Tigranocerta.

8. The Third Mithridatic War and Mithridates' Flight to Armenia.

9. Lucullus Demands the Extradition of Mithridates
and Prepares for War.

10. The Sudden Attack of Lucullus and his First
Encounter with the Armenians.

11. The Siege of Tigranocerta and Tigranes' Meeting
with Mithridates.

12. The Great Battle of Tigranocerta.

13. The Capture of Tigranocerta and the Collapse of
Tigranes'Grand Empire.
14. The Battles in Armenia and Mesopotamia (68 B.C.).

15. The Victorious Advance of Tigranes and Mithridates and Lucullus' Retreat.

16. Pompey's Incursion into Pontus and Mithridates' Defeat.

17. The Conclusion of Peace between Tigranes and Pompey.

18. Armenia and its Neighboring Countries after Pompey's Incursion.

Chronological Table.
Bibliography.
Index.

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