facebook
Cart

WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE <---> WINTER SALE IS GOING ON NOW! <---> CELEBRATING 39 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE IN PUBLISHING ---> SOME OF OUR TITLES ARE AVAILABLE IN IRAN. CONTACT: FARHANG MOASER, 154 DANESHGAH AVE., TEHRAN, IRAN. Tel. 66 46 5756. --->

Twenty Three Years: A Study of the Prophetic Career of Mohammad

Translated from the Persian by F.R.C. Bagley. [Also available in the original Persian text under "Bist-o-Seh Sal"]

Availability: In stock
Published: 1994
Page #: xvii + 228
Size: 5.5 x 8.5
ISBN: 1-56859-029-6
index, notes

 
$15.95

+ Add to Cart

Quick Overview

This study of Mohammad’s prophetic career by a modern Iranian thinker will be of great value to everyone interested in Islam and the Moslem people. Through the use of the early sources together with psychological and sociological analysis, Ali Dashti brings out the reality of Mohammad’s greatness, dispels the fog of superstition which has been built up around him, and discusses problems which are too often left unmentioned.
Dashti will long be remembered for his penetrating studies of Persian classics. In books on Omar Khayyam, Khaqani, Mowlavi Rumi, Sa‘di, Hafez, and Sa’eb, he picks out the elements in the works of these classical poets which have enduring value. The studies of religious matters which he wrote in his later years show the same perspective; chief among these is Twenty-Three Years. After the revolution of 1979, he was imprisoned and beaten, suffering serious injury. He died in late 1981 or early 1982.

author

Ali Dashti

(1898-1981 or '82)Ali Dashti is by all means an enigmatic figure in the pantheon of Iranian literary and political personalities that captured the public attention for a better part of the twentieth century. His career, in fact, stretched from the early 1920s to the time of his death in 1982 in the course of which he rose from plebeian to patrician and occupied all stations in between. Part of the fascination with Dashti’s public persona is due to his passionate defense of national dignity and social justice. The idea of a compact between the state and citizens, a guaranty of permanence for the former and security and welfare for the latter, remained a constant in Dashti’s political writing throughout his life. This is not by any means to say that Dashti was the only member of the Iranian intelligentsia to voice such ideas. Rather, he is unique in the fact that he proclaims his opinions with more vigor and directness than most. As such, Dashti may rightly be credited with inaugurating journalistic prose—a style of writing that self-consciously coalesces an ideological stance with independently verifiable facts—in the arena of Iranian political discourse. Dashti’s political activism resulted in arrests and incarcerations, and, surprisingly, a seat in the parliament. It must be understood that throughout the rule of the Pahlavi dynasty, except for brief interims following the Allied invasion of Iran in 1941 and during Mohammad Mossadegh’s tenure as premier (28 April 1951–19 August 1953), membership in the parliament was hardly elective. No individual could sit in either chamber of the parliament without the tacit approval of the royal court. As such, Dashti’s membership, representing a district he had never lived in, points up the fact that by this time his standing as a literary figure—fiction writer and literary critic—overshadowed his past as a dissident intellectual, and a seat in the upper house of the parliament was in recognition of that standing.

Login or Create Account