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Armenian Communities of the Northeastern Mediterranean

Musa Dagh—Dört-Yol—Kessab

Series: UCLA Armenian History & Culture Series 14
Availability: In stock
Published: 2016
Page #: xxiv + 512
Size: 6 x 9
ISBN: 978-1568593111
index, notes

 
$45.00

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Quick Overview

Armenian Communities of the Northeastern Mediterranean is the fourteenth volume to be published in the UCLA series, Historic Armenian Cities and Provinces. Even though the northeastern reaches of the Mediterranean Sea were not a part of historic Greater Armenia, situated far to the east, this region around the Gulf of Alexandretta was home to Armenian communities since antiquity. During centuries of foreign dominion, religion was the primary marker of identity, as the Armenian cycle of life centered around the church and, in the modern era, also around schools and cultural-political associations.

Although there were numerous large and small Armenian settlements and town quarters in the expanse between Cilicia in the north and the approaches to Lebanon in the south, this volume focuses primarily on Musa Dagh/Musaler, Dört-Yol/Chork-Marzban, and Kessab, with shorter excursions into Beylan, Antioch, the onetime Armenian villages of the Ruj valley, and several rather isolated existing villages near Latakia. In modern times, Musa Dagh, Dört-Yol, and Kessab have been the center of dramatic episodes in the history of the Armenian people. The heroic epics of self-defense might in themselves justify devoting an entire volume to an area far removed from the historic homelands and consisting of a number of relatively small enclaves.

This collection of essays is intended to offer an appreciation of the these distinct communities in the Northeastern Mediterranean and the rugged, sturdy people who lived, and, at least in the case of Kessab and a single small village in Musa Dagh, continue to endure there.

author

Richard G. Hovannisian

Richard G. Hovannisian is Professor of Armenian and Near Eastern History and First Holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University, and an Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Southern California for work with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and Ph.D. in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as the Associate Director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. Professor Hovannisian is a Guggenheim Fellow and has received many honors for his scholarship, civic activities, and advancement of Armenian studies. He is a founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies and has published thirty books and numerous scholarly articles, including 5 volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes by Mazda Publishers on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire.

List of Maps and Illustrations
Contributors
Preface

1. Armenian Communities of the Eastern Mediterannean
Richard G. Hovannisian

2. Armenian Settlements in the Antioch Region
Hagop Tcholakian

3. Armenian Musa Dagh in the Nineteenth
and Early Twentieth Century
Vahram L. Shemmassian

4.The Significance of Un-Making M-G-M’s
The Forty Days of Musa Dagh
Ara Soghomonian

5. Armenians, Alawites, and the Alexandretta Crisis, 1937-1939
Keith David Watenpaugh

6. The Oral Tradition of Musa Dagh
Sona Zeitlian

7. Culture and Personality: The Case of Anjar
Herant Katchadourian

8. The Popular Folklore of Musa Dagh Armenians:
Synchronous and Diachronic Changes
Verjiné Svazlian

9. Vakef Köy of Musa Dagh:
The Sole Armenian Village Remaining in Turkey
Vahram L. Shemmassian

10. Schools and Orphanages of Dört-Yol/Chork-Marzban
Vera Sahakyan

11. The Chork-Marzban/Dört-Yol Armenians:
Three Episodes of Self-Defense
Minas Kojayan

12. The Armenian Community of Kessab during the Period
of the French Mandate over Syria (1918-1940)
Isabelle Seda Mavian

13 Kessab as a Diasporan Community
Hagop Tcholakian

14. Paradise Lost and Regained in Kessab:
Narratives of Rebuilding and Migration
Susan Pattie

Index

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