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Armenian Smyrna/Izmir

The Aegean Communities

Series: UCLA Armenian History & Culture Series 11
Availability: In stock
Published: 2012
Page #: xiv + 210
Size: 6 x 9
ISBN: ISBN 13: 978-1568591582, 1-56859-158-6
plates, index

 
$35.00

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Quick Overview

From early antiquity, the Armenian people developed a rich and distinctive culture on the great Armenian highland plateau extending from Asia Minor to the Caucasus. On that crossroad, they interacted on many levels with civilizations of the Orient and Occident. Also from early times, Armenian colonies and communities were established beyond the highland, along the seacoasts of the Black, Mediterranean, and Aegean seas and onward to other continents.

One such community was that of Smyrna along the Ionian coastline, which figures so heavily in Hellenic civilization and biblical history. The natural harbor of Smyrna attracted merchants from around the world, and from the Middle Ages onward Armenian settlers arrived from throughout Asia Minor and from their troubled homelands stretching eastward to the plain of Ararat, Karabagh, and northern Iran. Although numbering barely 25,000 persons when the surrounding towns and villages are taken into account, the Smyrna community stood out in its prosperity and adoption of Western modes and styles. Its merchants flourished in the Italian city states and as far west as Manchester, England, and participated in the eastern trade as far as Persia and the Indian Ocean.

Smyrna, more familiar as Izmir in Turkish and modern usage, played a key role not only in Armenian commercial history but also in the national process of intellectual, cultural, and social enlightenment. Schools and churches, dramatic and musical groups, and athletic and sporting associations thrived there in the nineteenth century and into the twentieth century until the swift demise of the entire community in the chaos and Great Fire of 1922. All these aspects are presented in this volume.

The UCLA conference series, “Historic Armenian Cities and Provinces,” has been organized by the Holder of the Armenian Educational Chair in Modern Armenian History for the purpose of exploring and illuminating the historical, political, cultural, religious, social, and economic legacies of the Armenian people. Armenian Smyrna/Izmir is the eleventh of the conference proceedings to be published.

author

Richard G. Hovannisian

Richard G. Hovannisian is Professor of Armenian and Near Eastern History and First Holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University, and an Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Southern California for work with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and Ph.D. in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as the Associate Director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. Professor Hovannisian is a Guggenheim Fellow and has received many honors for his scholarship, civic activities, and advancement of Armenian studies. He is a founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies and has published thirty books and numerous scholarly articles, including 5 volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes by Mazda Publishers on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire.

CHAPTER 1
Armenian Smyrna
Richard G. Hovannisian

CHAPTER 2
Armenians on the Aegean: The City of Smyrna
Robert H. Hewsen

CHAPTER 3
The Armenian Communities of Smyrna and the Aegean Region from the Middle Ages to the Nineteenth-Century Tanzimat
Albert Kharatian

CHAPTER 4
Armenian Monuments and Textile Arts of Smyrna
Christina Maranci

CHAPTER 5
The Armenian Dialect of Smyrna
Bert Vaux

CHAPTER 6
The Missionary Armenian Language Press of Smyrna, 1833-1853
Barbara J. Merguerian

CHAPTER 7
Translators-Enlighteners of Smyrna
Sona Seferian

CHAPTER 8
Matteos Mamourian: A Smyrnean Contributor to the Western Armenian Renaissance
Robert H. Hewsen

CHAPTER 9
Armenian Intercommunity Relations in Late Ottoman Smyrna
Hervé Georgelin

CHAPTER 10
The Demise of Armenian Smyrna: An Oral History Perspective
Rubina Peroomian

CHAPTER 11
Two Armenian Physicians in Smyrna: Case Studies in Survival
Jack Der-Sarkissian

CHAPTER 12
Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller,and Smyrna 1922
David Stephen Calonne

CHAPTER 13
The Armenian Elite of Smyrna in the Formation of Associative Networks in Buenos Aires
Nélida Boulgourdjian-Toufeksian

CHAPTER 14
From Asia Minor to the Río de la Plata: Smyrna and South American Armenian Origins
Vartan Matiossian

Index

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