facebook
Cart

WELCOME TO OUR WEBSITE <---> SPRING SALE IS GOING ON NOW! <---> CELEBRATING 37 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE IN PUBLISHING ---> SOME OF OUR TITLES ARE AVAILABLE IN IRAN. CONTACT: FARHANG MOASER, 154 DANESHGAH AVE., TEHRAN, IRAN. Tel. 66 46 5756. --->

Armenian Kesaria/Kayseri and Cappadocia

Series: UCLA Armenian History & Culture Series 12
Availability: In stock
Published: 2013
Page #: xxiii + 368
Size: 6 x 9
ISBN: ISBN 10: 1-56859-159-4, ISBN 13: 978-1568591599
plates, index, notes, references

 
$35.00

+ Add to Cart

Quick Overview

From early antiquity, the Armenian people developed a rich and distinctive culture on the great Armenian highland plateau, extending from Asia Minor to the Caucasus. On that crossroad, they interacted on many levels with civilizations of the Orient and Occident. Immediately to the west of the Armenian highland and the Euphrates River lay Lesser Armenia with Sebastia at its center and Cappadocia with Mazaca, later known as Caesarea (Kesaria/Kayseri), at its center.

Interactions between Armenia and Cappadocia date to early antiquity, when Cappadocia became a contested marchland between empires of East and West. Caesarea also played an important role in Armenian Christian history, as it was there that Gregory the Illuminator, the evangelizer of Armenia, spent his formative years and it was there that he was ordained the first prelate of Armenia in the early fourth century. Because of the turbulent history of the Armenian kingdoms, the Armenian element in Cappadocia increased steadily in the Middle Ages. Byzantine expansionist policies and mounting Turkish pressure constrained Armenian kings and nobles to relinquish their domains in the east in exchange for expanses in Lesser Armenia and Cappadocia.

During the centuries of Ottoman rule, the Armenians of Kesaria were noted as goldsmiths and skilled craftsmen, professionals and producers of carpets, linens, textiles, leather goods, pottery, and cured beef. Beyond the confines of the city of Kesaria with its 20,000 Armenian inhabitants were numerous villages with a combined Armenian population of some 50,000. With their tightly-knit communities, strong religious faith, schools and churches, the Armenians of the Kesaria region managed to preserve their distinct identity down through the centuries. Like almost all other areas of Armenian existence in the Ottoman Empire, however, they were uprooted and deported toward the Syrian deserts in 1915, with very few of the survivors ever returning. These aspects figure among the multidisciplinary discussions in this volume—Armenian Kesaria/Kayseri and Cappadocia.

author

Richard G. Hovannisian

Richard G. Hovannisian is Professor of Armenian and Near Eastern History and First Holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University, and an Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Southern California for work with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and Ph.D. in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as the Associate Director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. Professor Hovannisian is a Guggenheim Fellow and has received many honors for his scholarship, civic activities, and advancement of Armenian studies. He is a founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies and has published thirty books and numerous scholarly articles, including 5 volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes by Mazda Publishers on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire.

1. Armenian Kesaria/Kayseri and Cappadocia
Richard G. Hovannisian

2. Armenia and Cappadocia in the Pre-Christian Period
James Russell

3. Caesarea and Traditions about Saint Gregory’s Consecration
Robert W. Thomson

4. Les Arméniens en Cappadoce aux Xe et XIe siècles
Gérard Dédéyan

5. Armenian Miniature Painting in Asia Minor in the Eleventh Century: The Melitene Group
Dickran Kouymjian

6. The Armenian Silversmiths of Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Kesaria/Kayseri
Sylvie Merian

7.The City of Kesaria/Kayseri in the Nineteenth Century
Bedross Der Matossian

8. Rural Kesaria in the Late Ottoman Period
Hervé Georgelin

9. A Tale of Twin Towns:Everek and Fenese
Jack Der-Sarkissian

10. The Fateful Years: Kesaria during the Genocide
Simon Payaslian

11. Armenian Textiles and Dress of Kesaria
Tina Demirdjian

12. Kesaratsis in South America
Vartan Matiossian

Bibliography
Index

Login or Create Account