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Armenian Pontus The Trebizond-Black Sea Communities

The Trebizond-Black Sea Communities

Series: UCLA Armenian History & Culture Series 8
Availability: In stock
Published: 2009
Page #: xx + 454
Size: 6x 9
ISBN: ISBN 13: 978-1-56859-155-1, 1-56859-155-1
plates, bibliography, index

 
$35.00

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Quick Overview

From early antiquity, the Armenian people developed a rich and distinctive culture on the great highland plateau extending from eastern Asia Minor to the Caucasus. On that crossroad, they interacted on many levels with civilizations of the Orient and Occident.

The golden plains, river valleys, and mountain ribs of the Armenian Plateau are separated from the lush, semitropical Black Sea littoral by the imposing Pontic mountain range. Nevertheless, associations between Armenia and Pontus date back to the era of the Persian Achaemenian Empire beginning in the sixth century B.C.Later in 401-400 B.C., the Greek general Xenophon traversed the Armenian Plateau as an escape route from the Persian heartlands to Trapezus (Trebizond) on the Black Sea, his account of that adventurous journey affording one of the earliest written descriptions of ancient Armenia. Economic and cultural interaction between Armenia and Pontus increased during the centuries of Roman dominion in Asia Minor and especially during the time of the medieval Greco/Byzantine Empire of Trebizond. Thriving, enlightened Armenian communities developed all along the extensive narrow corridor from Batum in the east to Samsun and Sinope in the west, while the curious Armenian enclave of Hamshen in the eastern Pontic hinterland retained much of its Armenian character long after its population was forcibly Islamized in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

The UCLA conference series, “Historic Armenian Cities and Provinces,” is organized by the Holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History with the purpose of exploring and illuminating the historical, political, cultural, religious, social, and economic legacy of a people rooted for millennia on the Armenian highland.

Armenian Pontus is the eighth of the conference proceedings to be published. Scholars from various disciplines offer the story of the Armenian communities in the Pontus-Black Sea region across the centuries until their violent elimination in the first decades of the twentieth century.

author

Richard G. Hovannisian

Richard G. Hovannisian is Professor of Armenian and Near Eastern History and First Holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University, and an Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Southern California for work with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and Ph.D. in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as the Associate Director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. Professor Hovannisian is a Guggenheim Fellow and has received many honors for his scholarship, civic activities, and advancement of Armenian studies. He is a founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies and has published thirty books and numerous scholarly articles, including 5 volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes by Mazda Publishers on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire.

List of Maps and Illustrations
Contributors
Preface

1 The Armenian Pontus
Richard G. Hovannisian

2 Armenians on the Black Sea: The Province of Trebizond
Robert H. Hewsen 37

3 Azzi-Hayasa on the Black Sea? Another Puzzle of Armenian Origins
Vartan Matiossian

4 Contacts between Armenia and Pontus in the Pre-Christian Period
Richard Wilkinson

5 The Armenian Ties to Medieval Trebizond
Abraham Terian

6 The Foundations of Hamshen and Armenian Descent Myths:
Parallels and Interconnections
Anne Elizabeth Redgate

7 Islamization of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire:
The Hamshentsi/Hemshinli Case
Claire Mouradian

8. The Dark Ages on the Black Sea? Manuscript Painting of Hamshen
Christina Maranci

9. Armenian City Quarters and the Architectural Legacy
of the Pontus
David Kertmenjian

10 The Pontic Armenian Communities in the Nineteenth Century
Bedross Der Matossian

11 Reform, Revolution, and Repression: The Trebizond Armenians in the 1890s
Barbara J. Merguerian

12 The Fate of the Armenians in Trebizond, 1915
Simon Payaslian

13 Ordu on the Black Sea
Vartiter Kotcholosian Hovannisian

14 The Postwar Trebizond Court-Martial
Richard G. Hovannisian

15 Pontus and Armenia, 1916-1922
Richard G. Hovannisian

16 History and Identity among the Hemshin
Hovann H. Simonian

17 Pontic Armenian Communities in the Kuban and Abkhazia
Igor Kuznetsov

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